Notes to Tacitus, Annales 15.32.3

spectaculum, -i, n.
public show, spectacle.
par, paris
equal to (with ac); ablative of description with magnificentia.
prior, prius, -oris
former, previous (i.e., in 62 CE); understand spectacula.
inlustris, -e
distinguished, of high social standing.
plus, pluris, comparative adjective of multus
rather many, more.
(h)arena, ae, f.
sand, arena.
foedo (1)
disgrace; make dirty; spoil the appearance of.

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Notes to Petronius, Satyricon [XLV]

Manius, -i m.
a common Roman praenomen, used generically, like “John Doe,” to refer to citizen males who have become so poor that they have sold themselves to the gladiatorial schools.
aliquot, indeclinable adjective
some.
mulier, -is, f.
woman; wife.
essedarius, -a, -um
of or belonging to a war-chariot; also used as a substantive: a fighter in a war chariot, specifically the esseda, a war chariot used by Gauls and Britons. The queen of the Iceni, Boudicca, drove her own war chariot in the British revolt of 62 CE, destroying a Roman legion and burning London. As a result, this gladitorial event would have seemed both exotic and thrilling to the urban populace.
dispensator, -oris, m.
treasurer, steward.
Glyco(n), -onis, m.
Greek male proper name.
deprehendo, -hendere, -hendi, -hensus
catch, arrest.
delector (1, deponent)
delight, seduce, have an affair with (this is the only occurrence of delecto as a deponent verb); subjunctive after temporal cum.
populi: the people will take sides and riot when the steward is brought into the arena.
rixa, -ae f.
quarrel; battle, skirmish.
zelot n.
indeclinable jealous man , referring to those supporting the husband.
amasiunculus, -a, m. f.
fond lover, a diminutive form, refering to those supporting the steward.
sestertiarius, -a, -um
worth only a sestertius (a small silver coin worth 2 ½ asses or ¼ denarius); of little value.
bestiae, -arum f. pl.
wild beast fight in the arena.
Hoc est:
that is, that is to say, namely; what follows is a more precise explanation of what was said just previously.
traduco, -ere, -duxi, -ductum
make a show of, expose to public ridicule, disgrace. By sending the dispensator to the arena, Glyco has made his wife’s behavior public knowledge.
pecco (1)
sin, crime, error.
cogo, -ere, coegi, coactus
compel, force. As her slave, the steward had to obey his mistress.
matella, -ae f.
a chamber-pot; a derogatory term for Glyco’s wife in light of her behavior.
magis ...digna ...quam:
more worthy that.
taurus, -i m.
bull.
iacto (1)
toss; gore; potential subjunctive, supply eam. Tying a woman to the horns of a bull was one form of punishment in the arena (see Passio Perpetuae).

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Notes to Martial, Liber De Spectaculis 6

belliger, -gera, -gerum
warlike, warring.
invictus, -a, -um
unconquerable, always victorious.
tibi: Domitian.
servio, -ire, -ivi, -itum + dat.
serve, be of use to
Caesar: another title signifying emperor; here, Domitian.


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Notes to Martial, Liber De Spectaculis 6b

prostratus, -a, -um
laid low; defeated; translate with in vasta valle.
Nemees, -es, f.
Nemea, the valley in Argolis, Greece, where Hercules killed the savage lion; the case is genitive.
leo, leonis m.
lion; the entire line is in apposition to nobile et Herculeum opus.
Herculeus, -a, -um
Herculean, of Hercules.
cano, -ere, cecinni, ---
sing, honor in song.
priscus, -a, -um
ancient, early, former.
fides, ei, f.
trust, honor; word; belief
taceo, -ere, -ui, tacitum
be silent; a hortatory subjunctive.
munus, muneris, n.
game, gladiator show.
femineus, -a, -um
feminine, of a woman. Note the startling juxtaposition of femineo Marte
hoc:
refers back to nobile et Herculeum opus.
fateor, fateri, fassus sum
accept as true; i.e., prior to Domitian’s games no one would have thought it possible for a woman warrior to fight well.


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Notes to Suetonius, Vita Domitiani 4.1

assidue adverb
continually.
edo, -ere, -edidi, editum
put forth, produce; the subject is Domitian.
non...modo ... verum et:
not only...but also.
praeter preposition w. the accusative
besides, in addition to; followed by etiam.
sollemnis, -e
usual, regular, annual.
bigae, -arum, f.pl.
two-horse chariot. What then does quadrigae mean?
cursus, us, m.
race
, running, course.
equestris, -tris, -tre
belonging to a horseman, equestrian.
pedester, -tris, -tre
on foot, infantry, pedestrian.
committo, -ere, -missi, mittum
bring together, undertake
at conjunction
but, then, now.
venatio, -onis f.
hunt; public show of fighting wild beasts; understand edidit.
lychnuchus, -i m.
lamp-stand, candlestick, chandelier (a Greek word); with ad = by lamp/torch light.


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Notes to Statius, Silvae 1.6.51-56

fremitus, -us m.
noise, uproar. In this poem Statius describes the huge Saturnalia celebration Domitian hosted in the Colosseum for the whole populace.
luxus, -us m.
extravagance, luxury.
spectandi: of looking, of gazing. Translate the gerund with voluptas.
levis, -e
light, trivial, quickly passing.
effugio, -ere, -fugi, ---
escape, flee
sexus, -us m.
sex, gender (here, the feminine sex).
rudis, -e
untrained, unskilled.
inscius, -a, -um
unacquainted with, unpracticed.
ferrum, -i , n.
iron; weapon.
ut, conjunction
an exclamation: How!
improbus, -a, -um
inferior; shameless; it is masculine because it modifies sexus. Note how Statius avoids calling the female warriors women.
virilis, -e
of men.
credas:
translate the potential subjunctive you would/could believe, followed by indirect statement
Tanais, -, m.
the Tanais river (the Don); it flowed through the territory of the Sarmatians, which began north of the Danube and stretched from the Don to the Vistula river.
ferus, -a, -um
wild, savage.
Phasis, -idos, m.
the Phasis river; it flows through Colchis and into the Black Sea.
Thermodontiacus, -a, -um
of the river Thermodon; here, of the Amazons. The Thermodon river flowed in the area of the Pontus, the homeland of the Amazons.
caleo, -ere, calui, ---
be hot, warm; glow; in reference to weapons and fighters, be warm with activity.
turma, -ae f.
a division of Roman cavalry; troop, band, unit.

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